Posts Tagged: Bee anatomy

Four Leaf Clovers

http://beeinformed.org/2012/07/four-leaf-clovers/

While processing honey bee samples for Varroa mites at the Bee Research Lab, I came across a sample with a large amount of white eyed as well as red eyed drones. After literally thousands of samples, I have never come across white eyed drones much less red eyed. This sample contained four white, seven red…

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White-Eyed Drones

http://beeinformed.org/2012/04/3939/

One of the best things about working at the Bee Research Lab in Beltsville is that rarely a day goes by when I don’t get to experience or learn a new fact about beekeeping. I am quickly realizing that although it seems like things in beekeeping are ‘cut and dried’ there are many exceptions to,…

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Insect Flight

http://beeinformed.org/2012/01/3252/

When you think of a honey bee, one adaptation that stands out is its ability to fly. Without flight, the honey bee would not be able to accomplish any of the tasks that allow its existence. There are two mechanisms of flight, one primitive and the other more advanced from evolutionary pressures to survive. The…

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How to store soft bodied insects

http://beeinformed.org/2011/12/2921/

In my last blog I explained how to pin and label bees. In this blog I am going to talk about another way to store and preserve soft bodied insects or larvae. This is particularly useful when you want to store the larvae or pupae of bees. There is an image above of different bee…

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Beekeeping Video Game to Identify Brood Stages

http://beeinformed.org/2011/11/beekeeping-video-game-to-identify-brood-stages/

OK, so maybe its not technically a video game, but Reed Johnson at Ohio State has developed an online program called Broodmapper.com  to inspect brood frames. Citizen science is a term used describe similar projects, where the general public participates in the collection and analysis of data. Often the tasks include an educational component. In…

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Ocelli or “Simple eye”

http://beeinformed.org/2011/10/2306/

The word ocelli is derived from the Latin word ocellus and means little eye. The ocelli are simple eyes that bees use to orientate themselves towards the sun. Located in a triangular shape are two dorsal ocelli and one central ocelli. They are located dorsally on the bees head (see images above for location). The…

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Bees-10, Me-0

http://beeinformed.org/2011/10/bees-10-me-0/

Last Wednesday I went out into the field to help with some feeding and ran into a little bit of trouble, though it was probably my own fault. I would like to blame the time of year and lack of nectar flow, the excitement brought on by the feeding or the nastiness of a certain…

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Tarsal claws hard at work

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/tarsal-claws-hard-at-work/

Ever wonder how bees can hold on so well? For starters, honey bees are insects that have 3 pairs of segmented legs. The legs can do more than just hold on, the tibia of the hind legs have adapted hair to hold pollen. When the hairs are filled with pollen,it is termed “pollen basket “or…

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