Posts Tagged: bip

European Foulbrood (EFB)

http://beeinformed.org/2013/12/european-foulbrood-efb/

EFB is often found when nectar flows are sporadic or there is an insufficient number of nurse bees to attend brood. How does EFB spread? European Foulbrood (Melissococcus plutonius) is transmitted when the bacteria become mixed with the bee bread, nectar or diluted honey, and then fed to young larvae. The bacteria then replicate in…

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Chalkbrood

http://beeinformed.org/2013/11/chalkbrood/

Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis) is typically observed during the spring but symptoms can be seen throughout the year. Chalkbrood contaminates larvae when the spores are mixed with brood food. The fungus will outcompete larvae for food and eventually turn the larvae into a “chalk-like” mummy. The color of chalkbrood ranges from white to grey then starts…

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American Foulbrood (AFB)

http://beeinformed.org/2013/10/american-foulbrood-afb/

How does AFB spread? American Foulbrood (Paenibacillus larvae) is introduced to the hive by drifting bees from nearby colonies, infected equipment/tools, beekeepers and robbing. The infection begins when spores enter the hive, and then food contaminated by spores is fed to the larvae by nurse bees. Once spores are in the midgut the bacteria take…

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Parasitic Mite Syndrome (PMS)

http://beeinformed.org/2013/10/parasitic-mite-syndrome-pms/

PMS or Parasitic Mite Syndrome is a condition that causes a honey bee colony to deteriorate and eventually dwindle away and die. There has not yet been a pathogen detected which causes the brood symptoms that appear with this syndrome. However there are always varroa mites present with this syndrome. The brood symptoms look similar…

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Update from the UMD Lab

Beekeeping this time of year in the Northeastern US is practically nonexistent. Honey bees cluster around their queen in their hives as below freezing temperatures, wind, and snow challenge their survival. Opening the hive in these kinds of conditions would be setting yourself up for failure. Winter this year in Maryland has been very unpredictable….

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Emergency Response Kits

http://beeinformed.org/2013/02/emergency-response-kits/

With 2013 already off to a running start, we at the Bee Informed Partnership are looking forward to the coming year and the many new initiatives we are planning on launching. One such project we unveiled in late 2012 was the Emergency Response Kits (ERK), which is a partner initiative with the USDA Bee Research…

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January Travel

http://beeinformed.org/2013/01/january-travel/

The past couple of weeks have been filled with exciting travel and great experiences. The month of January began with our annual BIP meeting where the team gathered in Hershey, PA to discuss the year’s accomplishments and the many tasks that lie ahead. Having all our far-away team members in the same room, speaking face-to-face…

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Honey Bee Autopsy

http://beeinformed.org/2011/04/honey-bee-autopsy/

It has been nearly four years since I began working for Penn State University under the supervision of Dennis vanEngelsdorp. I have done just about every task, duty, or job in our lab since then. My responsibilities as a technician range from collecting and analyzing samples to shipping and receiving samples, as well as cataloging,…

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