Posts Tagged: flowers

Know Your Local Pollinators!

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/know-your-local-pollinators/

Today I am posting on behalf of one of our undergrads, Tyler Connine. He is a pre-med biochemistry major at University of Maryland with a unique awareness of the natural world. Tyler is part of our ongoing Nosema project which is focused on the examination of individual bees for Nosema spores. Aside from his growing interest…

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Gardening for Pollinators

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/gardening-for-pollinators/

Warm weather is just around the corner which makes this the perfect time of year to begin planting a garden. Working in the garden is relaxing, a great form of exercise and adds to aesthetics of your yard, plus you get lots of yummy home-grown veggies! But why stop here? Knock two birds out with…

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Ranunculus Poisoning

http://beeinformed.org/2012/05/ranunculus-poisoning/

A few weeks ago Dennis received a call regarding a Maryland beekeeper concerning what was believed to be a pesticide kill.   Throughout the conversation it was learned that there was an abundance of the common pasture weed, buttercups (Ranunculus species), growing in close proximity to the hives.  The beekeeper noted that the bees appeared to…

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Tarsal claws hard at work

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/tarsal-claws-hard-at-work/

Ever wonder how bees can hold on so well? For starters, honey bees are insects that have 3 pairs of segmented legs. The legs can do more than just hold on, the tibia of the hind legs have adapted hair to hold pollen. When the hairs are filled with pollen,it is termed “pollen basket “or…

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Centaurea stoebe and Pollinators (Part 3)

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/centaurea-stoebe-and-pollinators-part-3/

In the previous two blogs, I have talked about the invasive plant “Spotted Knapweed.” Centaurea stoebe is native to Europe and was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s through contaminated seed. Spotted knapweed is considered by some a nuisance because it displaces native plants and forage for livestock. The plant releases toxins…

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Non-native bees and invasive plant species. (Part 2)

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/non-native-bees-and-invasive-species/

In the last blog, I talked about the invasive plant “Spotted Knapweed.” This plant is unique because it supports several oligolectic bee species, which means that the bees visit (for pollen and nectar) very specific host plant species. Lithurgus chrysurus, or the Mediterranean wood boring bee, is one of them (see previous blog). Another bee…

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Invasive plants supporting invasive bees

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/invasive-plants-supporting-invastive-bees/

  I have been collecting insects since 2005 and I collected almost anything unique to the eye. A majority of my collection was Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. In 2008, I started collecting native bees when I was using bowl traps for the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. My collecting was concentrated in Montgomery, Chester and Lehigh County….

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Yellow Star Thistle

http://beeinformed.org/2011/07/1272/

Since arriving here we have had the chance to meet and talk with a few of the beekeepers that we will be working with all year. We talked about many things including their bees, their operations, and the weather. The one reoccurring theme with all of them was talk of yellow star thistle. The yellow…

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