Posts Tagged: microscope

Examining Bacteria From Colonies with Foulbrood Symptoms

http://beeinformed.org/2012/09/examining-bacteria-from-colonies-with-foulbrood-symptoms/

Microscopy is a useful tool to diagnose honey bee problems. While working on some content for eXtension.org, I helped record the following video. These bacterial spores where found in a comb showing symptoms of American foulbrood disease. Paenibacillus larvae With Brownian Motion From a Honey Bee Colony Video description: Spores of the causative agent of…

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On the hunt…

http://beeinformed.org/2011/12/on-the-hunt/

 Our lab is filled with hustle and bustle as we hover over alcohol samples containing honeybees, searching for Varroa and Nosema.   The samples are placed on a machine meant to simulate a hand shaker, which trembles loudly as it shakes the parasitic Varroa mites from the bees.    The counting of mites brings back memories of…

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Nosema in the Lab

http://beeinformed.org/2011/11/nosema-in-the-lab/

Looking into the eyepiece of my microscope at the water-mount slides I have prepared, hardly anything I see resembles honey bees.  Coincidentally, everything appears a monochromatic amber-gold very close to the color scheme of the inside of a hive.  But that is really where the similarity stops.  Instead of seeing a humming colony of busy,…

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How to Pin Bees

http://beeinformed.org/2011/11/how-to-pin-bees/

In prior blogs, I talked about methods of collecting bees from nets to bowl traps. I am now going to talk about the process of pinning the insects that have been collected. If the collected bees are frozen, put them on a paper towel or tissue to dry for 10 minutes or so. I will…

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Field Work=Lab Work

The images in the gallery above can be thought of as four separate but related stories.  The first four slides are representative of what a day in the field means for our sampling team.  These pictures were taken two weeks ago in Siskiyou County, CA at apiary locations belonging to Queen Breeder Pat Stayer.  We…

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From the Flower to the Stomach

The gallery of slides above shows images of a honey bee workers proventriculus (pro+stomach).  Nectar from flowers is stored in a honey bees crop, or honey stomach, until it returns to its hive.  Once the forager reaches its hive nectar can be regurgitated and stored in cells.  It is nearly impossible for a bee to…

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Picking Blueberries

http://beeinformed.org/2011/06/picking-blueberries/

Maybe it’s my lack of time or poor sense of direction that has led me to become a creature of habit and not do the exploring I should be doing in my new residence in Maryland.  But, I have made up my mind to change that this weekend. It all started with a little sign…

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Pollen Nerds

http://beeinformed.org/2011/06/pollen-nerds/

I realize that I might be a little late in the season to talk about spring, seeing how the season is coming to an end as I am currently sweating it out in the Maryland heat. I just recently moved from Penn State to Maryland to do some work with the USDA for the summer—and…

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