Posts Tagged: nosema

To Bee Or Not To Bee

http://beeinformed.org/2013/05/to-bee-or-not-to-bee/

Ghonva Ghauri is a pre-med physiology and neurobiology major at University of Maryland. She is part of our ongoing Nosema project which is focused on the examination of individual bees for Nosema spores. Aside from microscopy, Ghonva has shown an interest in how honey bees have become a part of human cultures across the world. This…

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Know Your Local Pollinators!

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/know-your-local-pollinators/

Today I am posting on behalf of one of our undergrads, Tyler Connine. He is a pre-med biochemistry major at University of Maryland with a unique awareness of the natural world. Tyler is part of our ongoing Nosema project which is focused on the examination of individual bees for Nosema spores. Aside from his growing interest…

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Update from the UMD Lab

Beekeeping this time of year in the Northeastern US is practically nonexistent. Honey bees cluster around their queen in their hives as below freezing temperatures, wind, and snow challenge their survival. Opening the hive in these kinds of conditions would be setting yourself up for failure. Winter this year in Maryland has been very unpredictable….

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Emergency Response Kits

http://beeinformed.org/2013/02/emergency-response-kits/

With 2013 already off to a running start, we at the Bee Informed Partnership are looking forward to the coming year and the many new initiatives we are planning on launching. One such project we unveiled in late 2012 was the Emergency Response Kits (ERK), which is a partner initiative with the USDA Bee Research…

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Undergraduate Research in the vanEngelsdorp Lab

http://beeinformed.org/2012/12/undergraduate-research-in-the-vanengelsdorp-lab/

On December 7th, the undergraduates conducting research in the vanEngelsdorp lab at the University of Maryland gave their final project presentations. The samples our undergrad team analyzed came from a study performed by Jeff Pettis of the USDA Bee Research Lab. The study was based on 6 different apiaries in North Dakota looking to see…

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Busy Bees at BRL

http://beeinformed.org/2012/06/busy-bees-at-brl/

The past month has been very busy for us at the Bee Research Lab in Maryland. There was one week we received shipments of alcohol samples from all 3 BIP teams: California, Minnesota and Hawaii. It was only a few weeks ago when we had boxes stacked high waiting to be processed. I am proud…

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Honey Bee Lab from Home

From time to time we are approached by beekeepers who are interested in setting up their own labs so that they can take samples of their bees and test them for Varroa mites and Nosema spores. Most beekeepers know what a Varroa mite looks like so identification usually isn’t an issue. Counting Nosema spores can…

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Nosema in the Lab

http://beeinformed.org/2011/11/nosema-in-the-lab/

Looking into the eyepiece of my microscope at the water-mount slides I have prepared, hardly anything I see resembles honey bees.  Coincidentally, everything appears a monochromatic amber-gold very close to the color scheme of the inside of a hive.  But that is really where the similarity stops.  Instead of seeing a humming colony of busy,…

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When we turn to one another for counsel…

http://beeinformed.org/2011/10/when-we-turn-to-one-another-for-counsel-we-reduce-the-number-of-our-enemies-khalil-gibran/

“When we turn to one another for counsel we reduce the number of our enemies” -Khalil Gibran We are in the thick of our fall sampling which started in late September and will go until the end of November. The idea behind the fall sampling is to give each of the sixteen beekeepers involved in…

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Processing Samples for Varroa and Nosema

The video above was taken at the Butte County Cooperative Extension building in Oroville, CA. Rob and I moved to California a little over a month ago to work with 16 northern California honey bee breeders. Since arriving here we have had the chance to do some field work with a few of the beekeepers…

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