Posts Tagged: Pollen and pollination

Ranunculus Poisoning

http://beeinformed.org/2012/05/ranunculus-poisoning/

A few weeks ago Dennis received a call regarding a Maryland beekeeper concerning what was believed to be a pesticide kill.   Throughout the conversation it was learned that there was an abundance of the common pasture weed, buttercups (Ranunculus species), growing in close proximity to the hives.  The beekeeper noted that the bees appeared to…

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Cherry Bloom & Festival

http://beeinformed.org/2012/03/cherry-bloom-festival/

  The date to be in Washington has been announced. For what, you ask? The National Cherry Blossom festival, of course! This year’s festival is no ordinary festival, not that the cherry bloom can be anything but ordinary with its stunning views of gorgeous blossoms as far as the eye can see. This year marks…

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Bees in bare almonds

http://beeinformed.org/2012/02/bees-in-bare-almonds/

Right now, beekeepers are pretty much done with moving bees across the country and into the almonds. The beekeepers we work with are doing the same thing – moving colonies from their different yard locations across Northern California into the almonds. Now, everyone is anxiously awaiting bloom. The Blue Diamond Almond company has a website…

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The Cost of Freedom

Rob and I tore this hive apart today to have a look at what was going on inside. If you listen closely you may be able to catch parts of our conversation. The video tells the story of these bees and its struggle to survive…It can be viewed at the link below:

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Almonds, pollination and harvesting

http://beeinformed.org/2011/09/almonds-pollination-and-harvesting/

To get almonds you need pollinators. Above is an image of a handful of honey bee colonies out in an orchard during the almond bloom. This pollination starts at the end of January and throughout February depending on weather. There are close to a million honey bee colonies in California during the time of this…

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Centaurea stoebe and Pollinators (Part 3)

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/centaurea-stoebe-and-pollinators-part-3/

In the previous two blogs, I have talked about the invasive plant “Spotted Knapweed.” Centaurea stoebe is native to Europe and was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s through contaminated seed. Spotted knapweed is considered by some a nuisance because it displaces native plants and forage for livestock. The plant releases toxins…

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Can Man Survive on Water and Pollen Alone?

http://beeinformed.org/2011/06/can-man-survive-on-water-and-pollen-alone/

Back in November while presenting at the Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Meeting, I was asked, what I believed at the time, to be an unusual question. I was about to walk away from the podium when someone shouted, “have you ever eaten honey bee pollen?!” I was confused, thinking to myself “why would I do that?” When…

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Picking Blueberries

http://beeinformed.org/2011/06/picking-blueberries/

Maybe it’s my lack of time or poor sense of direction that has led me to become a creature of habit and not do the exploring I should be doing in my new residence in Maryland.  But, I have made up my mind to change that this weekend. It all started with a little sign…

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Pollen Nerds

http://beeinformed.org/2011/06/pollen-nerds/

I realize that I might be a little late in the season to talk about spring, seeing how the season is coming to an end as I am currently sweating it out in the Maryland heat. I just recently moved from Penn State to Maryland to do some work with the USDA for the summer—and…

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