Posts Tagged: pollination

Spring Blooms

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/cherry-blossoms/

Julius Goldberg is a pre-med undergraduate student who has been with us for two semester researching Nosema. Here is a blog from him. Enjoy! As spring rolls around, the atmosphere here in College Park begins to change. The birds start chirping, the squirrels resume munching, the hummingbirds start to hum, the bees buzz, and love…

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Know Your Local Pollinators!

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/know-your-local-pollinators/

Today I am posting on behalf of one of our undergrads, Tyler Connine. He is a pre-med biochemistry major at University of Maryland with a unique awareness of the natural world. Tyler is part of our ongoing Nosema project which is focused on the examination of individual bees for Nosema spores. Aside from his growing interest…

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Gardening for Pollinators

http://beeinformed.org/2013/04/gardening-for-pollinators/

Warm weather is just around the corner which makes this the perfect time of year to begin planting a garden. Working in the garden is relaxing, a great form of exercise and adds to aesthetics of your yard, plus you get lots of yummy home-grown veggies! But why stop here? Knock two birds out with…

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Bats As Pollinators

http://beeinformed.org/2012/10/bats-as-pollinators/

Last week we got the opportunity to sit on in some of the presentations at the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC) conference in Arlington, VA. A few of these talks mentioned or focused on unusual pollinators. To me, when I think pollinator I immediately think bee and I would guess it is the same…

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Cherry Bloom & Festival

http://beeinformed.org/2012/03/cherry-bloom-festival/

  The date to be in Washington has been announced. For what, you ask? The National Cherry Blossom festival, of course! This year’s festival is no ordinary festival, not that the cherry bloom can be anything but ordinary with its stunning views of gorgeous blossoms as far as the eye can see. This year marks…

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Bees in bare almonds

http://beeinformed.org/2012/02/bees-in-bare-almonds/

Right now, beekeepers are pretty much done with moving bees across the country and into the almonds. The beekeepers we work with are doing the same thing – moving colonies from their different yard locations across Northern California into the almonds. Now, everyone is anxiously awaiting bloom. The Blue Diamond Almond company has a website…

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Almonds, pollination and harvesting

http://beeinformed.org/2011/09/almonds-pollination-and-harvesting/

To get almonds you need pollinators. Above is an image of a handful of honey bee colonies out in an orchard during the almond bloom. This pollination starts at the end of January and throughout February depending on weather. There are close to a million honey bee colonies in California during the time of this…

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Centaurea stoebe and Pollinators (Part 3)

http://beeinformed.org/2011/08/centaurea-stoebe-and-pollinators-part-3/

In the previous two blogs, I have talked about the invasive plant “Spotted Knapweed.” Centaurea stoebe is native to Europe and was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s through contaminated seed. Spotted knapweed is considered by some a nuisance because it displaces native plants and forage for livestock. The plant releases toxins…

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Colletes inaequalis congregation area

This is a large congregation of Colletes inaequalis, commonly known as the “Mining Bee.” This natural phenomenon occurs between March and July. The bee ranges from Nova Scotia, Canada south to Georgia, United States. This bee is known to be polylectic (diverse forage), but can specialize on pollinating apples. Colletes will fly about a half…

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Where’s Mike Andree?

Can you find honey bee Crop Protection Agent, Mike Andree in this gigapan? Hint: He is sitting down on the job. See if you can find Mike Andree and tell him to get back to work. Use the navigator tools in the Gigapan window. To view this gigapan at gigapan.org, click here

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