Teamwork

The six most important words: I admit I made a mistake. The five most important words: You did a good job. The four most important words: What is YOUR opinion? The three most important words: If you please. The two most important words: Thank You. The one most important word: We. The least important word: I. –Unknown   Our team works in a previously unoccupied basement room. In a previous life, it used to be filled with boxes holding old alcohol sample bottles. Various insects had taken up residence with the absence of people, the flooring tiles were coming up and the sink drain had…

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Hive tool to the rescue

Cooking is a hobby I really enjoy. I am not terribly good at it, but I like to practice. Farmer’s Markets are my favorite place to shop since you can get fresh produce and chat with some of the people who put it on your table. I purchased some kale the other weekend and decided to sauté it in a bit of olive oil and salt – properly done it tastes like popcorn. However, the oil got too hot and melted my spatula into my cast iron skillet. It took me a while to figure out how to save my beloved pan, but it came…

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UCCE to Lead Technology Transfer in New Honey Bee Health Initiative

http://ucanr.org/news/?uid=1386&ds=191 UCCE to lead technology transfer in new honey bee health initiative: The technology transfer component of a newly funded nationwide initiative designed to monitor and maintain honey bee health will be hosted by UC Cooperative Extension in Butte County... UCCE news story: http://ucanr.org/news/?uid=1386&ds=191

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Nationwide Partnership Seeks to Halve Honeybee Losses

News story at: http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/may2011/2011-05-19-092.html UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania, May 19, 2011 (ENS) - A new nationwide network to monitor and maintain honeybee health is being created by the Bee Informed Partnership. Their goal is to help honeybees to recover from assaults such as mites, fungii, pesticides, competition by alien species, the disappearance of flowering plants, air pollution and climate change that have caused bee colonies to collapse not only across the United States but around the world....

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PSU Leads Multidisciplinary Effort to Save Honeybees

News story at http://www.pamatters.com/2011/05/26/psu-leads-multidisciplinary-effort-to-save-honeybees/ Researchers from seven universities, beekeepers in every state, economists, epidemiologists and others have joined the Bee Informed Partnership.  Senior extension associate at Penn State Dennis vanEngelsdorp is leading the project, and tells us honeybees are essential to agriculture. “About one in every three bites of food we eat is either directly or indirectly pollinated by honeybees,” he says.... News story at http://www.pamatters.com/2011/05/26/psu-leads-multidisciplinary-effort-to-save-honeybees/

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How to collect bees

Before going out to collect bees there are a few things that you will need. Some of items are essential for collecting faster flying specimens. You should have small lidded containers to place the bees in. If you put small pieces of tissue in the container, those pieces give the bees something to hold on to and prevent the bees from becoming wet from regurgitated nectar. Using a net is the easiest method to collect bees. Try to avoid decapitating flower heads when collecting bees. One way to do this is to watch the direction that the bees fly away from the floral source and…

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Samoan Honey

Dan Gordon, a hobby beekeeper and his wife, Becky, were kind enough to have me over for dinner last week. Besides cooking the best squash dish I ever had, he gave me a jar of honey. This was no ordinary honey. He purchased it from the only commercial beekeeper in the small country of Samoa in the South Pacific. The beekeeper owns Tropical Honey Company. The jar label reads “This is pure natural tropical honey, with a unique flavor, is gathered from a variety of nectar sources found in the plantations and rainforests on the islands of Samoa”. It is pretty good. Now, imagine being…

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…Continued: Eggs, Larvae, Pupae, Queen

Over the last few weeks I have been writing about the importance of hive inspections and field notes covering some of the attributes of the hive one might choose to identify, observe, interpret, and record. I introduced the attributes in a blog that included an example of the field data sheets we use during our inspections. In the weeks following the initial blog, entitled “Field Notes and Hive Inspection”, I briefly touched on how to estimate a hives’ adult population in terms of frames of bees and how to spot eggs in the cells of the brood nest. The previous blog on eggs, larvae, pupae,…

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