Posts Categorized: Pest and Disease Control

Spotlight on Valley Oak

https://beeinformed.org/2012/09/18/spotlight-on-valley-oak/

As we enter the final week of summer it seems fitting to talk about Quercus lobata Née, the Valley Oak. This tree is a late summer source of bee forage in Northern California where forage is scarce going into the fall. Valley oaks are endemic to California and are found in the interior valleys and…

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Examining Bacteria From Colonies with Foulbrood Symptoms

https://beeinformed.org/2012/09/06/examining-bacteria-from-colonies-with-foulbrood-symptoms/

Microscopy is a useful tool to diagnose honey bee problems. While working on some content for eXtension.org, I helped record the following video. These bacterial spores where found in a comb showing symptoms of American foulbrood disease. Paenibacillus larvae With Brownian Motion From a Honey Bee Colony Video description: Spores of the causative agent of…

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Phorid Fly (Light Trapping)

https://beeinformed.org/2012/08/20/phorid-fly-light-trapping/

The past few months I have been trying to capture honey bees that are infected with Phorid Flies in the Chico, CA area. So what is a Phorid Fly? It is a fly commonly referred to as the humpback-fly because of its appearance. Previously the fly was known to parasitize bumble bees and paper wasps…

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Antlions (Myrmeleontidae)

https://beeinformed.org/2012/08/03/antlions-myrmeleontidae/

Previously I wrote a blog about an insect known as a “Wormlion.” I suspected this insect to be an Antlion at first. I then figured that not many people knew what an Antlion was so I figured I would blog about them. Antlions are in the order Neuroptera which in English translates into “nerve-wings.” An…

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Tropilaelaps Mites

https://beeinformed.org/2012/07/24/tropilaelaps-mites/

Among the many diseases and pests that the APHIS National Honey Bee Survey samples are analyzed for is the exotic parasite, the Tropilaelaps mite. These mites are native to tropical Asia and are a serious threat to the honey bee. While they naturally use the giant honey bee (Apis dorsata) as their host, Tropilaelaps mites…

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It’s Raining Frass!

https://beeinformed.org/2012/07/17/its-raining-frass/

In early June I experienced an outbreak of forest tent caterpillars (FTC), Malacosoma disstria, while sampling at an apiary in west-central Minnesota. Not only were the hive lids covered with frass, the technical term for insect feces, but the caterpillars themselves were falling on both the lids and my shoulders as I worked. According to…

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Wax Moth Damage

https://beeinformed.org/2012/07/11/wax-moth-damage/

One of this summer’s projects involves documenting a frame that is succumbing to a wax moth infestation. As I am finding out, through this documentation, wax moths are a highly destructive moth that attack honey bee frames, chewing their way through comb and wood and devastating an already weak colony. The damage is rapid, dirty,…

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Entombed Pollen

https://beeinformed.org/2012/06/28/entombed-pollen/

Through National Survey sampling and helping with USDA field work and forage studies I have had the opportunity to evaluate many different hives from Maryland to California to North Dakota over the past year. These hives hare both stationary and migratory, having been placed in many locations across the US, and have provided me with…

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