Posts By: Rob Snyder

2017 Spring Pollen and Nectar Source: Pussy Willow

https://beeinformed.org/2017/02/14/2017-spring-pollen-and-nectar-source-pussy-willow/

As spring approaches and the days grow longer, more plants are starting to bloom, including pussy willows. These plants usually bloom here in Northern California between February and March. There are several species of this plant but Salix discolor is the most commonly found. I usually find these trees near water though they are also…

Read More »

Bee Informed Partnership Diagnosis and treatment of Common Honey Bee Diseases Wins Bronze!

https://beeinformed.org/2015/12/16/bee-informed-partnership-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-common-honey-bee-diseases-wins-bronze/

At Apimondia this year our training manual for ‘Common honey bee diseases’ was submitted in the book category.  This simple training manual was entered among many other highly competitive books and won a bronze award to our surprise!  I originally wanted to create a honey bee disease/diagnosis manual because  most of the literature had very…

Read More »

European Foulbrood (EFB)

https://beeinformed.org/2013/12/13/european-foulbrood-efb/

EFB is often found when nectar flows are sporadic or there is an insufficient number of nurse bees to attend brood. How does EFB spread? European Foulbrood (Melissococcus plutonius) is transmitted when the bacteria become mixed with the bee bread, nectar or diluted honey, and then fed to young larvae. The bacteria then replicate in…

Read More »

BQCV (Black Queen Cell Virus)

https://beeinformed.org/2013/12/04/bqcv-black-queen-cell-virus/

So what is a virus? A virus is an infectious agent that parasitizes a host cell to replicate. Viruses can cause clinical symptoms, larvae death, or no symptoms at all. BQCV is caused by a virus in the family Dicistroviridae. BQCV is in the genus Cripavirus, which is different from other viruses like Acute Bee…

Read More »

Chalkbrood

https://beeinformed.org/2013/11/01/chalkbrood/

Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis) is typically observed during the spring but symptoms can be seen throughout the year. Chalkbrood contaminates larvae when the spores are mixed with brood food. The fungus will outcompete larvae for food and eventually turn the larvae into a “chalk-like” mummy. The color of chalkbrood ranges from white to grey then starts…

Read More »

Sacbrood Virus (SBV)

https://beeinformed.org/2013/10/29/sacbrood-virus-sbv/

SBV or Sacbrood Virus (Morator aetatulas) often appears during spring or colony buildup and causes larval death. The pupa fails to pupate and has a “shrunken head” appearance. When you see perforations in the sealed brood with the infected larvae inside, the perforation is usually choppy or jagged indicating a problem. If the SBV pupa…

Read More »