Posts Categorized: Pest and Disease Control

AFB, Sweat & Toil

https://beeinformed.org/2011/07/25/afb-sweat-toil/

Well, today is a scorcher here in Maryland and it is only Monday. The temperature is supposed to reach the low hundreds by Thursday. It makes me want to jump into a pool of ice rather than step into my bee suit and head out to the field. I had the intention of going out…

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Chalkbrood

https://beeinformed.org/2011/07/15/1309/

When I started inspecting for honey bee diseases, the first and most prevalent disease I found was chalkbrood. I first observed this disease a few weeks into the spring while inspecting a few colonies. I had seen the disease on several other occasions, so it was very easy to identify by the hard “chalk-like” mummies…

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EFB

The first time I encountered this notable disease was in 2005. My professor at the time had a frozen frame with European Foulbrood. He held up the frame and asked what we saw wrong with it. The first thing I noticed was the shotgun brood pattern. I looked closely and observed contorted/twisted larvae. The symptom…

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What is that Smell?…American Foulbrood!

https://beeinformed.org/2011/05/26/whats-that-smell-american-foulbrood/

Three summers ago I was hired as a Pennsylvania Apiary Inspector. When I started this job I thought back to my mentor Dr. Robert Berthold. He taught us bee diseases and pest by showing slides and using key descriptive words. This inspired me to start photographing various diseases and pest found inside and outside of…

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Nosema

https://beeinformed.org/2011/04/27/nosema-2/

Nosema. This gut fungus is still a mystery to me. The more I sample, the less it seems to make sense. I take samples for Nosema, analyze them, and provide the results to the beekeeper. The idea is to provide hopefully useful information to help with treatment decisions or decisions on choosing breeder. However, when I…

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Colletes inaequalis congregation area

This is a large congregation of Colletes inaequalis, commonly known as the “Mining Bee.” This natural phenomenon occurs between March and July. The bee ranges from Nova Scotia, Canada south to Georgia, United States. This bee is known to be polylectic (diverse forage), but can specialize on pollinating apples. Colletes will fly about a half…

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